Author's posts

Policy through Principle

In my last look at the U. S. terrorist detention policy, with a focus on Gitmo, I argued that now is the time to craft a better policy. The emphasis on property/geography, while relevant, distracts us from the real core issue to be resolved: principle. We as a nation are going about it backwards. Principle should …

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Guantanamo – 10 Years at the Starting Line

It was ten years ago that the United States opened up the now infamous detention facility nicknamed “Gitmo”. Gitmo, or Guantanamo Bay as it is formally known was first leased to the United States in 1903. Under the terms of a lease provision by Cuban dictator Batista in 1934, it cannot be terminated except by …

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Accessorize for Good – World AIDS Day

Today is World Aid’s Day. We hope that you will use this day to support the local charities and organizations in your communities that are working to fight the spread of HIV and AIDS. We also hope that you will research and learn more about the impact of AIDS on global health, families and communities …

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One Journey

Using Art for Social Change Many people live less than a half hour away from their extended family. But what if the distance that separated your family was not due to geographic miles but national boundaries? What if you could see the city where your family lived but were unable to visit because you had …

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The Most Forgotten Aspect of Ecotourism

In my last blog post I wrote about The International Ecotourism Society’s list of 10 energy saving tips for travelers, and today I will cover another aspect of sustainable tourism promoted by TIES: economic impact.  It isn’t enough to reduce your carbon footprint while traveling; you must also increase your economic footprint, otherwise it isn’t …

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Women and Sustainable Development

Women in many parts of the African continent perform up to 80% of the labor in their respective countries, yet are often denied basic rights, such as the right to own land, to access credit, and to operate their own businesses. They are the fundamental caregivers and providers of their families, yet many of them …

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SMART Aid

In my research on sustainable development programs, I have always been interested in organizations that focus on efficient and effective aid strategies in their work. I was particularly impressed with The ONE Campaign’s clever acronym explaining what “SMART” Aid means to them: S – Sufficient in scale to achieve its intended goals. M -Measurable so …

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What You Don’t Know About U.S. Foreign Aid

This week Congress has been debating the upcoming year’s budget, with the new Republican leadership in the House of Representatives vowing to cut spending as much as possible. Included in those spending cuts is US Foreign Aid, or Official Development Assistance (ODA). House Republicans proposed up to 50% cuts in the funding of critical development …

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“Poverty Trap” or “Dead Aid”?

For decades, economists, historians, scholars and the like have studied economic development on the continent of Africa, seeking to explain what factors account for the region’s slow growth. From my own research, two interesting schools of thought have emerged: the concept of the “Poverty Trap” as purported by venerated economist and director of the UN …

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Subsidizing Poverty (Part Two)

It’s not only poor subsistence farmers in developing countries who pay the price for agricultural subsidies—we all do. Literally. The subsidies paid to the agricultural industries in rich, Western countries are funded by we, the taxpayer. In the United States, this amounts to about $286 billion in taxes under the 2008-2012 Farm Bill, or approximately …

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