Shelter in Place Order and What It Means During Child Abuse Prevention Month

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month

In just a short month, states across the U.S. have been unsettled by the alarming rates of new COVID-19 cases being announced each day. While the majority of Americans are fighting this battle in isolation from the comfort of their homes, many are finding it difficult to escape the stress and anxiety of it all. Peaking rates of anxiety across households due to job loss, food insecurity, lack of health insurance, and overall fear, pose the largest threat to our most vulnerable populations. Child abuse and neglect rates are predicted to peak in the coming weeks due to higher stress levels in the home. According to Child Advocates, sexual abuse rates have disproportionally increased in minors under the age of 18 since the shelter-in-place order was established. In the midst of self-isolation, many of us may find it difficult to support those in need. Here are a couple of tools to pass along to parents and families who may be in need of support during these hard times:

Develop Supportive Communities

While keeping physical distance, it may be helpful to reach out to your community members at this time and lend your support. Offer any extra food to those who may be experiencing food insecurity, child care to parents in need of a sitter or those working from home who are struggling to also teach their school-aged children. In times of isolation, many people may be utterly alone, a simple phone call, letter, or video chat can make all the difference in someone’s day. Here are some of the ways communities are coming together while keeping physical distance:

Make Healthy Relationships With Your Family

Near or far, check on your family members. Call your loved ones and see how they are doing, how they are managing their stress, and if they need additional support. Social distancing has also impacted children who are currently being challenged by a new educational curriculum and technology. Take some time to talk to your children about how they may be feeling right now and find ways to help them continue connecting with friends, family, or teachers. In the home, try developing family-centered activities like a movie night, arts and crafts, cook or eat meals together, or simply share a space in the home where you can feel connectedness, even if you are all doing something different. In the current state, our human relationships outside of our homes have been strained by the absence of physical presence, make use of the time you have together and develop healthy bonds that extend past this pandemic. 

Feeding Your Family

During a pandemic as this, many families and households may be experiencing severe food insecurity. A poor diet and malnourishment increase the likelihood of illness and stress levels. If you or someone you know is currently lacking food, visit your local food bank to help feed your family. In addition, consider applying for Supplementary Food Programs like SNAP/CalFresh. For more information on supplemental food, programs visit here: https://www.getcalfresh.org

Managing Stress

Managing stress is most difficult when we are not even aware it is happening to us. The unfortunate truth about stress is that sometimes we may not be aware that we are feeling it. Stress acts in many ways including feeling irritated, angry, hopeless, worried all the time, having trouble sleeping, overeating, or even not eating at all. It is normal to be having these feelings. But here is what you can do to cope: 

Accept what you can’t do: trained professionals are currently working hard for us to stop the virus from spreading. If you are practicing health safety and staying at home, then you are doing your part and you are doing your best

Take care of your health: ensure that you are washing your hands and staying at home unless it is essential for you to leave your home. Make sure you are eating and drinking plenty of fluids. Exercise with home workouts, or play some of your favorite music and dance around your home. Most importantly, take care of your mental health. Take a moment throughout the day to take a deep breath, practice mindfulness and gratitude, and remind yourself that you are not alone in this.

Develop a supportive network: If the stress you are feeling is too overwhelming to address on your own, reach out for help. Reach out to friends, family, colleagues, or neighbors. There are trained professionals who are also available to support you in these times of need.

How to Help

If you suspect a child is in danger of abuse or neglect, please call the National Child Abuse Hotline 1-800-4-A-Child (1-800-422-4453) or visit childhelphotline.org for more information.

If you or someone you know may be experiencing Domestic Violence/Intimate Partner Violence, call 1-800-799-7233 or visit thehotline.org for more information. 

These are difficult times, if you, or a friend or family member is expiring depression or considering harming themselves, call the national suicide prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org for more information.

COVID-19 has posed a huge threat to the wellbeing of our most vulnerable populations. At a time when many things seem uncertain, it is important to remember the significance of building communities and fortifying our relationships. It is together, that we can prevail in such unsettling times. 

Share

They Love Me, They Love Me Not: A Look at Teen Dating Violence Signs and Prevention

teen dating violence awareness month logoValentine’s Day, arguably the most romantic holiday of the year, is fast approaching. As you prepare to share this day with your loved ones, take a moment to reflect on what being in a loving healthy relationship means to you. For some people, especially our youth, being in a relationship may be a completely new phenomenon. Join us in educating our youth on healthy relationship building as we increase awareness for intimate partner violence in teen dating and prepare for a future with less violence.

What is Teen Dating Violence?

Teen Dating Violence is a form of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) that occurs between two people in a relationship. IPV is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship. According to the Centers for Disease and Control, Teen Dating Violence takes several forms:

  1. Physical Violence: when a person hurts or tries to hurt a partner by hitting, kicking, or using another type of physical force.
  2. Sexual Violence: forcing or attempting to force a partner to take part in a sex act, sexual touching, or a non-physical sexual event (e.g., sexting) when the partner does not or cannot consent.
  3. Psychological/Emotional Abuse: use of verbal and non-verbal communication with the intent to harm another person mentally or emotionally and/or to exert control over another person.
  4. Stalking: a pattern of repeated, unwanted attention and contact by a partner causes fear or concern for one’s own safety or the safety of someone close to the victim.

Facts on Teen Dating Violence

  • 1 in 11 female teens and 1 in 15 male high school students report having experienced physical dating violence in the last year.
  • About 1 in 9 females and 1 in 36 male high school students report having experienced sexual dating violence in the last year.
  • 26% of women and 15% of men who were victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their life first experienced these or other forms of violence by that partner before age 18. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Report, victims of teen dating violence are more likely to experience symptoms of depression and anxiety, engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol and are at higher risk for victimization during college and throughout their lifetimes.

What Are the Signs of Teen Dating Violence?

A person experiencing IPV may have unexplainable recurrent injuries,  isolate themselves from friends and loved ones, but in most cases, there are no signs that may indicate that someone is experiencing IPV. For this reason, it’s crucial to be aware of the prevalence of domestic abuse. Discuss dating violence with your peers, and learn about ways to help.

How Can You Help a Teen Experiencing Dating Violence?

Talking about intimate partner violence may be the hardest thing a young teen may have to do. If you are experiencing teen dating violence or suspect that someone else is, here are some resources that may help. Remember, you are not alone and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

www.LoveisRespect.org

www.BreaktheCycle.org

24/7 National U.S. Hotlines

Teen Dating Abuse Helpline: 1-866-331-9474 (or text “loveis” to 22522, any time, 24/7/365)

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-4673

Trevor Lifeline (for LGBTQ* youth): 1-866-488-7386

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255

National Domestic Violence Hotline – 1-800-799-7233

National Hotline for Crime Victims: 1-855-484-2846

National Street Harassment Hotline: 1-855-897-5910

Flyer of February 18 online conversation with Jasmine Uribe from Break the Cycle.Take Action

We need to shift the narrative around dating violence, honor youth voices, build community, and address the intersections of violence. Please join our online conversation with Jasmine Uribe, the Chief Program Officer at Break The Cycle, on Tuesday, February 18, 4 PM PST / 7 PM EST. Together we can end dating violence. Click here to register now!

Share

Supporting Migrant Children Part 2: Educators & Schools

students outside school standing togetherSchools play an important role in supporting migrant children as they integrate into their communities or navigate the challenges of growing up as children of migrant parents. Educators can provide a place for migrant children to feel safe, learn about their community, build friendships and connections, and discover their innate strengths. Schools can support parents through active inclusion, workshops, events, and other engagement opportunities. While these undertakings can seem daunting, this blog will provide ways that schools and educators can begin creating supportive, trauma-informed environments for migrant children and their families.

Every child’s experiences and needs are different, and support works best when it is tailored to each child. Thorough, individualized assessments at the beginning of the year can help teachers get to know each student and can provide insight into the creation of personalized learning and support. Educators need to be aware of the challenges each migrant child, both first- and second-generation, may be facing. Multiple variables contribute to a child’s integration and academic success; thus, areas to consider during an assessment in addition to academic level include language, psychosocial and familial challenges, past experiences, and cultural norms and values. Due to the likelihood of past trauma and complex issues, an assessment may best be done in conjunction with the school counselor if available. 

Diverse children and parents playingIn addition to focusing on the child, actively involving the parents is crucial to a student’s academic success. For recent arrivals, parenting in a new country can be confusing with unfamiliar school systems, norms, policies, values, and expectations. Educators can play an important role in a family’s integration into the community, benefiting both the parents and the students. To do so, extend an inclusive and welcoming atmosphere to the parents or guardians from the very beginning. Translate all documents, events, and communications. Create school-based workshops that incorporate things like English language and literacy development, information about the U.S. school system, how they can best support their children in school, their rights as members of the community, and how to access healthcare and other important services. 

While partnership from the beginning is good, it can take a while to build trust between the school and the parents. Building trust is important for helping families feel comfortable with social engagement and utilization of the information and workshops provided for them. Begin by educating the staff so they understand the cultural aspects involved with communication and resistance to engagement. By understanding where the families are coming from, you can show that you are partnering with them and are available to discuss any stigmas or fears that might be holding them back. You can show that you are on their side by ensuring confidentiality and protection from ICE raids, providing information on their rights, and asking them how they feel they can best be involved with the school. Trust goes both ways, so it is also important to actively listen and trust what the families are telling you. 

classmates sitting together workingAs students navigate the school environment, their peers can play a significant role in their progress and successful integration. Facilitate friendship and peer support through activities such as buddy systems, peer-to-peer language learning, and extra-curricular activities. These connections can help migrant children gain skills and confidence, and help all students learn the benefits of diverse perspectives and experiences. Mentorship programs with adults or older peers can also increase confidence, support, well-being, and positive learning outcomes. Creating an atmosphere of belonging at school is very important because a sense of belonging plays a strong role in how well children integrate or grow in their community. 

When working with migrant students, it is important to understand that they, especially first-generation migrants, have likely experienced a lot of trauma in their past – even school-related trauma. One example is that many children who migrate from Central America are afraid to attend school because schools were used as areas for gang recruitment. Past traumas and current psychological challenges both in and outside of school may lead to significant barriers in development and academic achievement. Consider providing school-based therapy tailored to migrant students. A recommended evidence-based intervention is Trauma Systems Therapy for Refugees (TST-R), which is designed to focus contextually on a child’s needs and environment both inside and outside of school. This holistic approach involves a clinician, cultural broker, and other providers tailored to the specific needs of a child and his or her family. 

With the understanding of migrant children’s unique experiences comes a responsibility to promote empathy and respect towards them and their families. Challenge the acceptance of any negative stereotypes that you come across both inside and outside of the classroom. Show respect for their culture and language; convey that it is valuable to retain and not just something to be replaced. Support proficiency in their first language as a skill, and provide opportunities for them to share their language and culture with their peers. 

In order to develop and maintain culturally competent support in and outside of the classroom, continuous staff training is essential. Professional development training should involve anyone who is part of the school, including bus drivers, substitute teachers, and cafeteria workers. Topics covered can include cultural sensitivity and basic language courses in the students’ first languages. Additionally, make sure that any translators involved with the school are proficient with vocabulary related to trauma and emotional and sexual abuse. 

Many schools across the country may have the desire to implement programs and initiatives like the ones outlined here, however, they simply do not have the resources to do so. Teachers report frustrations due to wanting to help but not being able to due to budget cuts. Everyone, including community members, is encouraged to advocate for increased funds and resources for educators and the school system. With the right initiatives and the resources to implement them, schools can be an invaluable resource for migrant children and their families. Let’s work together to help students achieve their full potential, accomplish their dreams, and live the successful lives that they deserve. 

Download the infographic below and keep it as a quick reference for the initiatives covered in this blog.

Infographic with initiatives

Share

Supporting Migrant Children Part 1: Community Members

Children playing outside

Out of all of the children living in the United States, over 25% live with at least one migrant parent. These first- and second-generation migrant children make up a significant portion of our population, having made the journey to the U.S. themselves or being born to parents that did. As community members, we must create welcoming and supportive communities for children and families who have faced and continue to face impactful traumas and challenges.

Knowing where to start, however, can seem overwhelming. This blog will provide ways that any community member can become involved in welcoming, supporting, and empowering migrant children. As the following ideas are implemented, it is important to internalize an empathetic approach with a mindset of

I am here with you and let’s do this together; not I am here for you, to save you, or to make things better for you.

Additionally, think about what you can learn from your experiences with migrant children and families. A great thing about integration into a community or society is that it is a two-way process; it involves change experienced by migrants as well as change experienced by those already living in the society.

adult with child holding a heartOne of the simplest things that you can do is listen, support, and encourage. Children who have faced a lot of trauma often just need someone to listen. Be a friend, and offer support and encouragement. You can make them feel valued just by providing friendship and letting them know you have their backs. Provide them with any information they need, and make sure that they understand their rights and protections as members of the community. Remember that this is just as important for second-generation migrant children as well, as they try to fit in with their schools and society. They may still be suffering from different types of trauma, including transgenerational trauma from their parents’ experiences.

Migrant children and families often arrive without knowing about the service available to them, including mental health and healthcare, and do not know where to go to find this information. When possible, provide information and connect them with services available in the community. The culturally-driven and environmentally-created stigma surrounding some services, especially mental health services, may prevent families from reaching out and accessing the help that they need. You can work to build rapport and trust so that they feel comfortable utilizing the available services.

If you are a professional in an area that can assist migrant children and families, consider offering your services pro bono to eliminate the financial barrier of accessing needed assistance. Additionally, you can educate yourself on their culture and unique challenges to ensure that your services are culturally competent. Common services that are needed include healthcare, mental health, law, homeless, and translation services.

Children and families may also struggle to take advantage of services due to transportation challenges, especially in rural areas. Unaccompanied children particularly may need rides, including to places like immigration services and court hearings. Think about offering rides to those who need it. In addition to assisting them with where they need to go, it can provide opportunities to bond and make them feel valuable and welcome in the community.

father holding daughter handUnaccompanied minors that arrive in the country may have no one to take care of them and can end up in shelters or the foster care system. Even children who have relatives in the country may never live with them because many families fear that if they come forward to claim the child they will be deported. Additionally, children whose parents are suddenly deported can end up in the foster care system if no other arrangements have been made. Consider becoming a foster parent and providing stability and support for a migrant child. You can also assist migrant parents in creating a plan for childcare or custody in the event of deportation.

A lot of the misconceptions, stigma, and fear surrounding migrants come from a lack of knowledge and understanding. Educate yourself about the stories, trauma, and challenges of migrant children and then raise awareness of what you learn. Additionally, social interaction is one of the best ways to break down negative stereotypes and create trusting relationships. Encourage interaction and the use of trauma-informed approaches with migrant populations. By doing so we can create receptive, supportive communities that foster healing and smooth integration processes for migrant children and families. 

You can also support local and national organizations that are providing services for migrant children by either donating, volunteering, attending events, or raising awareness of causes. Use this link to access the Immigration Advocates Network directory and enter your zip code to find organizations that provide a variety of services in your area. 

And finally, connect with advocacy organizations and participate in their events and advocacy efforts. Migrant children need advocates and people on their side who will support their stories and their suffering and help them create a path forward towards a stable, fulfilling life.  

For more ways to support migrant children and families simply ask them what they need assistance with, or ask your local immigration center what else you can do. Together we can create communities that heal trauma, foster growth and development, and support the children of our future. 

Download the infographic below and keep it as a quick reference for the suggestions covered in this blog.

Infographic on how community members can support migrant children

 

Share

Education Reform: Helping Maltreated Youth by Increasing Protective Factors in Schools

Students sitting around a table

Child maltreatment is associated with a disruption in early brain development and long-term consequences such as behavioral, physical, and mental health problems. Several studies have linked maltreatment to delinquency, and child maltreatment and delinquency to societal problems. Maltreated youth often become “crossover youth” or “dually involved,” which means that they become a part of multiple systems. About 92% of “crossover youth” are first involved in the child welfare system before the juvenile justice system. These youth are 47% more likely to engage in both nonviolent and violent delinquent and criminal behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood.

Maltreated youth experience risk factors in their home environments, and these risk factors increase the likelihood of children engaging in negative behaviors. However, there are “buffers” or protective factors that can help youth counteract these adverse circumstances. Protective factors are strengths and support that buffer against risk by reducing the impact of risk, changing the way the youth responds to it, and allowing the youth to succeed despite the risk. For both nonviolent and violent behaviors, a connection to school can be a strong protective factor for maltreated youth.

Children and ways to increase protective factorsHow Schools Can Increase Protective Factors

School, classroom environments, and experiences play a significant role in the surfacing and persistence of aggressive behaviors in students. A positive school climate is important in motivating students in the learning process. Furthermore, students who receive support from teachers and peers in school are more likely to partake in positive activities and exhibit positive behaviors. Supremely, our goal is to empower youth and increase their self-efficacy so that they feel enabled to succeed despite their circumstances. This can be achieved at school on both micro (individual) and mezzo (school and community) levels.

Daily Personal Interaction

Schools have the power through daily interaction to help children develop and strengthen protective factors and to help shape youth’s beliefs in their abilities to achieve. Teachers, coupled with a positive school climate, can promote resilience, achievement, coping skills, and overall self-efficacy by increasing the ability to manage healthy relationships and resist peer pressure. Some best practices for teachers include caring relationships with students. A teacher can foster caring relationships by:

  • Providing support, respect, and compassion
  • Maintaining high expectations that help students believe in their resilience and abilities
  • Challenging but supporting the students
  • Providing stern guidance while maintaining freedom in structure
  • Using strengths-focused and student-centered approaches
  • Contributing to reframing how students identify themselves and their circumstances

Allow children the opportunity to participate in their learning and engage in interactive group processes and activities that include reflection, dialogue, and critical thinking. Teachers should give children responsibilities in class and invite students to play a part in establishing classroom rules and curriculum. We can empower students in classrooms by encouraging creative expression, providing experiences and opportunities that play to their strengths, and inspiring service to others.

It is also particularly beneficial for teachers and school administrators to engage in trauma-informed practices. Because trauma can impact a child’s development, being trauma-informed requires that educators exemplify social-emotional skills in their actions. When a teacher develops caring and safe relationships infused with hope, this can teach kids how to build relationships and a foundation of trust and hope, which is important to resilience. An educator who has unconditional positive regard for each student can help students feel they are worthy of care regardless of their behavior or experiences. Furthermore, as an educator, try sharing what you are feeling instead of hiding your emotions, and invite the entire class to engage in a positive coping mechanism that you use.

School Climate, Community-Building and Beyond

By improving the curriculum, schools can incorporate mental health education and mandatory social workers and counselors on campus. Schools can implement programs, such as peer mediation programs, that improve school climate. Peer mediation programs are designed to increase the protective factors of social and emotional competence and decrease risk factors such as aggression and antisocial behavior. Implementing a peer mediation program or incorporating peer mediation in classes may include:

  • Teaching students to negotiate constructive resolutions to their conflicts
  • Teaching students to mediate constructive resolutions of their classmates’ conflicts
  • Creating a peer mediator selection process that involves selecting peer mediators and rotating these responsibilities among students, thus allowing every student the chance to serve.

Incorporating peer mediation can help youth gain skills like self-regulation, situation assessment, judgment-making, and decision-making to produce the desired outcome. Peer mediation can also help teach peacemaking and autonomy. These are skills that contribute to cognitive and social development.

Finally, investment in schools and ultimately communities, particularly in urban areas and minority communities with high numbers of risk factors, can bolster protective factors. If we know that childhood abuse is linked to adult interpersonal problems and psychological dysfunction, why not help youth while we can? If we do not help youth fight when they are young, we leave them vulnerable to becoming victims of their circumstances. Let’s address these issues at the root through education reform by instilling protective factors in school curriculums.

Share

Supporting Refugee and Migrant Children

Picture of children

Families and children from across the world are escaping to our borders in the hopes of living in a country where they will be safe from harm and have opportunities for a successful future. These children and families are changing the landscape of immigration as we know it. In the past few years, the immigrant population has shifted dramatically at our southwest border from 90% single adult Mexican men to 60% families and unaccompanied alien children (UACs) from Central America.

Women with two children

Maritza Flores with her two daughters

The increasing anti-immigration rhetoric in the U.S. portrays immigrants as dangerous criminals, but gangs, drug trafficking, corruption, and weak national laws all contribute to the prolific violence that is sending families and children running for protection. Conditions are so bad that in 2016, Honduras and El Salvador even had the two highest rates of homicide in the entire world. Maritza Flores, who traveled to the U.S. border in 2018, said in an interview,

“Many people think we left because we are criminals. We’re not criminals – we’re people living in fear in our countries. All we want is a place where our children can run free – where they’re not afraid to go out to the shops.”

Children who leave their countries in the wake of trauma and make the long journey to the U.S. find themselves re-traumatized upon arrival at the border and at risk of severe mental health and development challenges. On the southern side of the border, metering practices at ports of entry have resulted in long wait times in dangerous, squalid refugee camps, prompting families and children to make the difficult decision whether to cross the river and enter illegally, or stay where they are for an indefinite amount of time, potentially endangering their lives. On the U.S. side of the border, however, conditions are barely better. If traveling as a family unit, children may be separated from their guardians. Additionally, UACs and accompanied children alike often find themselves in detention centers long past the legal limit of 72 hours, resulting in dangerous health environments and even death.

What Can We Do?

There is no easy fix to the immigration crisis; it will require a collaboration across borders to address the root causes in violent, war-torn countries in Central American as well as throughout the world. The voices of refugee children escaping violence in other parts of the world, including Africa and the Middle East, have been quieted at the moment due to less news coverage and stricter policies that prevent many from entering the U.S. and telling their stories. But we cannot forget them, and while we in our communities may not be able to solve the world’s crises, we can at least care for and support the world’s children.

We can support the children trying to reach our borders and support their well-being in every step of the immigration process. Importantly as well, we can help those who are beginning new lives in the U.S. as they navigate the challenges of integrating into our schools and communities. We need to protect and restore their mental health, give them the support they need to succeed, and eradicate hateful discrimination against them.

Advertisement for webinarThese children are our future. Everyone from community members to professionals to educators can help. Join us for our Alliance for Positive Youth Development Best Practices for Youth Conferences on August 5-7, as we discuss this issue further and learn best practices for supporting refugee and migrant children. The second day of workshops is devoted to this topic and includes an expert Q&A panel featuring Bhairavi Asher, Children’s Representation Project Managing Attorney at ImmDef, and Nicolas Hernandez, Organizing Director at RAICES Texas. Following this will be a presentation by Sarah Kim Pak, UCLA Public Service Fellow at the National Immigration Law Center. Register for free at ideas4youth.org/apydcon.

 

Share

Education Reform: Redefining School Safety & Violence Prevention

Kid in front of a school gate

School shootings have become rising occurrences that have plagued American culture. In fact, school safety has been a growing issue around the world. About 150 million 13 to 15-year-old students worldwide have said they experience violence in the form of physical fights, bullying, physical punishment by teachers, or attacks on classrooms and campuses. This is an attack on our most vulnerable, yet most important population. Increasing safety means redefining what school safety and violence prevention mean.

One proposed response to school violence is increased security—armed teachers, school security, or police officers on campuses. Equipping teachers with guns, police with guns, and having more guns on campus is essentially fighting guns and violence with more guns and violence. While I understand that could be appropriate in very specific situations (e.g., when schools are under attack), there are negative implications of having armed authority on campuses. Teachers are often not adequately trained, and minorities often bear the brunt of punishment when armed authority is placed in schools. Minorities are more likely to be treated as adults and viewed as a threat. Accordingly, minorities are more likely to be involved in “in school” arrests or referred to law enforcement. Ultimately, research shows that there are increased risks to children when there is the presence of a gun, and we should do whatever we can to reduce this possibility.

An appropriate response to school safety and violence prevention may not be armed protection on campuses. Instead, a better response may be instilling mental health education and services in schools and changing the culture of the environment of schools. Looking at the problem as we have traditionally, elicits responses that typically reflect political agendas, false narratives, groupthink, and band-aid surface-level solutions. When kids are facing threats at school, it is a time to come together, think like social workers, and come up with real solutions that will create sustainable change.

Prioritizing Mental Health in Schools

School Social Worker PictureAn appropriate response to school safety and violence prevention should come from the consideration of big-picture thinking, systems analysis, and bio-psycho-social analysis. As a social worker, I advocate for looking at problems from a “systems” approach so that we can create effective and holistic solutions. This often requires redefining the “problem.” While school violence has been on the rise, youth mental health statistics have as well. In fact, mental health problems are a risk factor for school violence, though not the cause. This tells us that maybe school safety and violence prevention is a school climate problem.

Therefore, a more appropriate response to school violence may be paying more attention to incorporating mental health education in schools, teaching kids positive conflict resolution skills, and developing a positive conflict culture. We teach physical education in schools as a requirement a part of the curriculum. When are we going to prioritize mental health education and make it a part of the curriculum as well? Schools that have made this attempt have shown favorable results so far. School-based mental health programs have resulted in reduced anxiety, improved grades, lowered substance abuse rates, and reduced school bullying. Essentially, mental health education programs in schools can help prevent violence and create a positive learning environment.

Our focus should be empowering youth to make better decisions, improving relations, and creating the change we want. The solution is to invest in our youth. Instead of looking at “go-to” solutions and legal remedies, let’s try education reform—it’s the social work way.

Ready to Learn More?

For further discussion, join us for the Alliance for Positive Youth Development Conference (APYDCON) happening August 5-7, 2019. The first day of workshops will focus on School Safety and Improving School Climate. The first event will be an expert Q&A panel featuring Aaron Kupchik, Juvenile Justice/Sociology Professor at the University of Delaware, and Robert Hernandez, Senior Lecturer at USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work Dept of Children Youth and Families. Following this session will be a presentation by Andrea Vasquez, Co-Director of the Latinx, Afro-Latin-America, Abya Yala Education Network in Toronto, Canada. The panel and presentation will offer tangible solutions to help create safe school environments. Register for this free unique virtual conference at http://ideas4youth.org/apydcon.

Flyer of APYDCON 2019

 

 

Share

Puerto Rico After María: Sicómoro Inc.

Sicomoro Inc is a Christian faith based organization helping the children and families in Puerto Rico recover from Hurricane Maria

Sicómoro Inc. is a Christian based organization that started in 2005 in Barrio Obrero, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, and serves disadvantaged communities. This organization provides bible studies, educational workshops, and food and clothing banks. Sicómoro Inc. has worked with the communities of Puerto Rico before and after Hurricane María. Volunteers from Sicómoro helped after Hurricane María by cleaning homes, restoring access in roads, and distributing food and water. This organization also provides educational and recreational services for youth and children. Sicómoro Inc. promotes social values, build self-esteem and promotes activism and leadership in the youth by preparing them through involvement in the different programs and services. After Hurricane María, resources have become more limited and like other nonprofit organizations, Sicómoro is facing challenges with sustainability due to the economic crisis.

Help Puerto Rico Rebuild

Sicómoro Inc. is an excellent example of the impact Hurricane María had in local agencies in the Island, and how organizations have cope to serve their communities. One great way to support Puerto Rico is to continue to support a specific cause.  To support Sicómoro Inc., you can visit their website, or you can visit “Con Puerto Rico en el corazón” (with Puerto Rico in our heart) to purchase a shirt-100% of the sales are used for their programs. Our organization, SISGI Group Beyond Good Ideas Foundation also has a Hurricane fund where you can donate and support Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, and the British Virgin Islands.

View the video below for an interview with Julio Gonzalez from Sicómoro Inc., and click here to watch the rest of the “Voices4PR” video series.

 

Versión En Español

Sicómoro Inc. es una organización de base cristiana que comenzó en 2005 en Barrio Obrero, Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Esta organización proporciona estudios bíblicos, talleres educativos, y maneja un banco de comida y un banco de ropa para la comunidad. Sicómoro Inc. ha trabajado con las comunidades en Puerto Rico antes y después del huracán María. Los voluntarios de Sicómoro ayudaron después del huracán María limpiando casas, restaurando el acceso a las carreteras, distribuyeron alimentos y agua a quienes lo necesitaban. Esta organización también ofrece servicios educativos y recreativos para jóvenes y niños. Sicómoro Inc. promueve los valores sociales, fomenta la autoestima, promueve el activismo y el liderazgo en la juventud al prepararlos a través de la participación en los diferentes programas y servicios. Como cualquier otra organización sin fines de lucro, el desafío de Sicómoro es la sostenibilidad debido a la crisis económica, y después de María, los recursos se han vuelto más limitados y los voluntarios necesitan apoyo.

Sicómoro Inc. es un excelente ejemplo del impacto que tuvo el huracán María en las agencias locales de la isla, y de cómo las organizaciones se las arreglan para poder servir. Una excelente manera de apoyar a Puerto Rico es continuar apoyando una causa específica. Hay muchas áreas en las que Puerto Rico necesita ayuda, y tal vez usted pueda brindar apoyo a través de conexiones y recursos que puedan satisfacer necesidades específicas. Para respaldar a Sicómoro Inc., puede visitar el sitio web o visitar ‘Con Puerto Rico en el corazón’ y donar. Nuestra organización, Sisgi Group BGI Foundation tiene un fondo para huracanes para donar y apoyar a Puerto Rico.

Share

Puerto Rico After María: Relief for Puerto Rico

Relief for Puerto Rico is in need of services and donations to help rebuilt Puerto Rico

Relief for Puerto Rico (Relief4PR) was established due to the need for reputable organizations able to distribute supplies and resources after Hurricane Maria impacted the Island. Relief for Puerto Rico works as a collaborator with other organizations and people’s donations, by distributing supplies like food and water. In Puerto Rico, the pipes distributing water work with electricity and if people don’t have electric power, they don’t have water. Relief for Puerto Rico is working to replace fossil fuel equipment with renewable solar energy. The intent to promote renewable solar energy is having some obstacles, starting with the new tax on solar technology imposed by the president of the United States, Donald Trump. This new tax obligates Puerto Rico distributors and companies to only purchase to Americans suppliers, and impose a rise of 30% increase in imports on solar energy materials. Relief for Puerto Rico and other agencies are looking to partner with other organizations to provide the needs in the hard to reach communities on the center of the Island and on Vieques y Culebra.

Puerto Rico Needs Your Help

If you would like to partner or donate to Relief for Puerto Rico, please visit their website at relief4pr.org. To become a short-term $25 monthly donor, visit the SISGI Group Beyond Good Ideas Foundation Hurricane Fund. The SISGI Beyond Good Ideas Foundation will provide mini-grants and supplies to individuals and community-based groups in Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands, and the British Virgin Islands to help meet their needs, and supplies to begin to rebuild their lives. There are no operating costs and 100% of the fund is used directly to support residents and communities recovering from the hurricane. 

View the video below for an interview with Betsy Collazo from Relief for Puerto Rico.

Versión En Español

Relief4PR (alivio para Puerto Rico) se estableció debido a la necesidad de contar con organizaciones acreditadas capaces de distribuir suministros y recursos después de que el huracán María impactó a la isla. Esta organización trabaja como colaborador con otras agencias y como distribuidor de las donaciones de personas, de cosas como alimentos, agua y alcanzando comunidades que no tienen actualmente electricidad. En Puerto Rico, las tuberías que distribuyen el agua funcionan con electricidad y si las personas no tienen energía eléctrica tampoco tienen agua. Esta organización también está trabajando para reemplazar equipos que utilizan combustible fósil por equipos que utilizan la energía solar renovable. La intención de promover la energía solar renovable está teniendo algunos obstáculos, comenzando con el nuevo impuesto a la tecnología solar que impuso el actual presidente de los Estados Unidos, Donald Trump. Este nuevo impuesto obliga a los distribuidores y empresas de Puerto Rico a comprar solo a proveedores estadounidenses e impone un aumento del 30% en las importaciones de materiales de energía solar. Relief4PR y otras agencias están buscando y tratando de asociarse con otras organizaciones para satisfacer las necesidades de las comunidades que no son accesibles y que se encuentran en el centro de la isla. Esto incluye las islas de Vieques y Culebra.

Puerto Rico necesita su ayuda. Si desea asociarse o donar, visite relief4pr.org y también visite SISGI Group para obtener información sobre nuestro fondo para huracanes.

Share

Puerto Rico After María: Tarps for My People

relief after hurricane maria

One goal of the SISGI Beyond Good Ideas Foundation #Voices4PR social media campaign is to raise awareness of the current situation in Puerto Rico. Many families in Puerto Rico are still without electricity stability, clean water, roofs, and resources to satisfy other basic needs. The mental health traumatic effects after María are still untreated, and the suicide rates continue to rise after Hurricane María. The suicide hotline rate increased 246% from people who attempted suicide, and 83% of people who had suicide ideation. Not only the people who were affected by hurricane María need mental health services, but the existing network of mental health providers are in need of psychological support too. As a SISGI intern, I had the opportunity of interviewing three representatives of organizations working on the ground to help rebuild Puerto Rico. The organization’s Tarps for My People, Relief for Puerto Rico, and Sicómoro Inc. are working on specific causes and have direct contact with the people in need of services. 

After hurricane Maria, 370,000 homes did not have a roof, and FEMA only repaired 75,000 homes. Unfortunately, this situation has left hundreds of homes without roofs and resources. Experts predict Puerto Rico’s rebuilt process will take around ten years. Tarps for My People began three weeks after the impact of Hurricane Maria when the nonprofit founder, Amarilis Gonzalez, watched an elder couple taking their clothes and mattress out to sundry every morning on her way to work. After experiencing and observing how people without roofs were struggling daily, Amarilis wrote a Facebook post where she expressed her frustration about the delaying relief response. Soon after, Tarps for My People started installing tarps for the houses without roofs. After a year of service, the organization has been able to build trust with the communities and use social media as a channel to connect and network with other organizations. Tarps for My People biggest challenges are: they only work on Saturdays due to the need of volunteers, the need of a truck to mobilize the materials, and the ability to have carpenters available to work for free.

If you would like to contribute and lower the expected years it will take for Puerto Rico to rebuilt, and help families in need; you can go to tpmgcorp.com to donate to this organization. You can also donate to our Beyond Good Ideas Foundation Hurricane Fund at http://sisgigroup.org/hurricane-fund/. There are no operating costs and 100% of the fund goes directly to individuals and community-based organizations impacted by the hurricane.

View the following video for an interview with Tarps for My People Founder, Amarilis Gonzalez.

Versión En Español

El principal objetivo de la #Voices4PR campaña en las redes sociales es crear conciencia sobre la situación actual que los puertorriqueños continúan viviendo aún después de un año del huracán María. Hay muchas familias sin energía eléctrica, agua limpia, techos y sin recursos para satisfacer sus necesidades básicas. El trauma que dejó el paso del huracán María y el efecto que tuvo en la salud mental de muchos puertorriqueños son consecuencias de la negligencia de un gobierno que no se preocupa en preparar y educar al pueblo para enfrentar un desastre natural de esta magnitud. Después de María muchos puertorriqueños todavía no reciben el cuidado médico y el tratamiento de salud mental adecuado para poder superar el trauma, los daños y pérdidas. La tasa de la línea directa PAS (Primera Ayuda Psicosocial) del Departamento de Salud aumentó 22,500 llamadas más que en el año 2016. De esta cantidad de llamadas, 24.607 fueron de personas con ideas de suicidio y 7,456 fueron de personas con intentos de suicidios. Puerto Rico es la tercera jurisdicción de Estados Unidos con mayores problemas de salud mental, no solo las personas afectadas por el huracán María necesitan servicios de salud mental, sino que la red existente de proveedores de servicios de salud mental también necesita apoyo psicológico. Tuve la oportunidad de entrevistar a tres representantes de organizaciones que trabajan en la isla directamente, tratando de ayudar a reconstruir a Puerto Rico. Las organizaciones “Relief for Puerto Rico”, Toldos pa’ mi Gente  y Sicómoro Inc., están trabajando en causas específicas y tienen contacto directo con las comunidades y las personas que necesitan los servicios. 

Después del huracán María, 370,000 casas no tenían techo y FEMA solo reparó 75,000 casas. Desafortunadamente, esta situación deja a cientos de hogares sin techo y recursos que han sido provistos por organizaciones como Toldos pa’ mi Gente. Los expertos predicen que el proceso de reconstrucción de Puerto Rico tomará alrededor de diez años. Toldos pa’ mi Gente comenzó tres semanas después del impacto del huracán María. Amarilis González, es una de los muchos puertorriqueños que sentía empatía y dolor al observar todos los días camino al trabajo a una pareja de ancianos sacar su colchón para secarlo al sol, por que no tenían techo en su hogar. Después de experimentar y observar cómo las personas sin techo luchaban diariamente, escribió una publicación en Facebook, donde expresó su frustración por la respuesta tardía para ayudar a los puertorriqueños. Toldos pa’mi Gente, comenzó solo instalando toldos azules enviados por diásporas y organizaciones que deseaban ayudar. Después de un año, la organización ha podido demostrar y construir una gran reputación en las comunidades donde han servido.

Esta organización, como otras organizaciones en Puerto Rico, enfrentan muchos desafíos, uno de ellos es que solo trabajan los sábados debido a la necesidad de voluntarios, la necesidad de un camión para movilizar los materiales y la capacidad de tener carpinteros disponibles para trabajar gratis. Si desea contribuir y reducir los años que tardará el reconstruir a Puerto Rico, y poder ayudar a las familias necesitadas, vaya a tpmgcorp.com para donar para esta organización. Además, nuestra organización SISGI Group, tiene el sitio web del fondo para huracanes http://sisgigroup.org/hurricane-fund/.

Share