Category: Alliance for Positive Youth Development

Education Reform: Helping Maltreated Youth by Increasing Protective Factors in Schools

Students sitting around a table

Child maltreatment is associated with a disruption in early brain development and long-term consequences such as behavioral, physical, and mental health problems. Several studies have linked maltreatment to delinquency, and child maltreatment and delinquency to societal problems. Maltreated youth often become “crossover youth” or “dually involved,” which means that they become a part of multiple …

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Supporting Refugee and Migrant Children

Picture of children

Families and children from across the world are escaping to our borders in the hopes of living in a country where they will be safe from harm and have opportunities for a successful future. These children and families are changing the landscape of immigration as we know it. In the past few years, the immigrant …

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Education Reform: Redefining School Safety & Violence Prevention

Kid in front of a school gate

School shootings have become rising occurrences that have plagued American culture. In fact, school safety has been a growing issue around the world. About 150 million 13 to 15-year-old students worldwide have said they experience violence in the form of physical fights, bullying, physical punishment by teachers, or attacks on classrooms and campuses. This is …

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#APYDCON 2018: LGBT+ Bullying in School Settings

The Alliance for Positive Youth Development (APYD) is getting ready to launch it’s 6th annual Best Practices for Youth Conference (APYDCON) on August 6-8th. This 3-day free virtual conference consists of expert panels with Q&A sessions and afternoon lectures. This year’s themes are Trauma-Sensitive Education, Youth Homelessness, and LGBTQ Bullying in School Settings. Our SISGI …

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#APYDCON 2018: Youth Homelessness

Approximately 4.2 million young people experience homelessness during the course of a year. A runaway or homeless youth can be anyone between the ages of 14 to 24 who do not have a stable place of residence. This includes living on the street, shelters, “couch surfing,” sleeping in cars or public transit systems or living …

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(Emotional) Safety First: Supporting Students with Trauma Histories

“As your school counselor, your safety is my first priority.” I cannot count how many times I have said that phrase to students, and I’m pretty good at counting. It was usually one of the first things I said as part of a quick, limits-of-confidentiality spiel, and it helped set the tone for what students …

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#APYDCON 2018: Trauma-Sensitive Education

The Alliance for Positive Youth Development (APYD) is one of the program initiatives within our Beyond Good Ideas Foundation. APYD is an international membership network connecting and supporting individuals that have dedicated their career to youth and youth development. Each year we host an online Best Practices for Youth Conference (APYDCON) focusing on three themes …

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#APYDCHAT: Ending Youth Homelessness

Approximately 4.2 million youth in America are experiencing homelessness. Unfortunately, being homeless is something that is not always visible to the public eye. Homeless youth, in particular, are a hidden population that often couch-surf with friends, and are left out of most Point-in-Time counts. Still, current data indicate that youth homelessness is on the rise. From …

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#APYDCON 2017: Youth Activism and Social Change

In 2014, Malala Yousafzai became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy in education for girls in Pakistan and around the world. Xiuhtezcatl Roske-Martinez is the youth director of Earth Guardians and is at the frontline of climate change activism. Malala and Roske-Martinez are two of many youth activists who …

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#APYDCON 2017: Crisis Intervention for Prostitution and Child Trafficking

Thirteen-year-old “Abby” is the youngest child of four. She would spend her days hanging out with her friends at school and at night, like most children her age, she enjoyed browsing through Facebook and Instagram. She had recently connected with a boy her age through Facebook and had fun chatting with him. Little did Abby …

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