Tag: International Development

Jun 24

“Failed” States?

Foreign Policy’s  annual Failed State Issue came out today, along with their 2013 Failed State Index, uses twelve social, economic, and political indicators to analyze nations and then ranks them accordingly, with 120 being the worst possible score a state can receive.  The states are then separated into five categories: critical, in danger, borderline, stable, and most stable. …

Continue reading

Share

Jun 18

Are ASEAN’s Goals Achievable?

When I think of current events in Southeast Asia, the things that pop into my head are authoritarian regimes, ethnic tensions, border clashes, and so on. There is an entire list of current conflicts going on in this region. An example of a border dispute would be Thailand conflicting with neighboring Myanmar, Malaysia, Laos and …

Continue reading

Share

Jun 14

Extreme Poverty in Lao PDR

Lao PDR has one of the highest growth rates in Southeast Asia with 6% increase every year in the last decade. Even the level of poverty has been declining. However, the country is still one of the least developed in Southeast Asia and the level of poverty is still largely apparent in this economy. Laos …

Continue reading

Share

Jun 06

Education Development in Cambodia

Did you know that Cambodia has a literacy rate of 74 percent? That is considered one of the lowest rates in Asia. Literacy rates are used to determine education quality in each country. However, the primary education completion rate in 2009 was 84 percent and has been slowly increasing. The literacy rate is fairly low …

Continue reading

Share

Jun 04

Why Education for Girls is a Worthwhile Investment

“First, I think girls’ education may be the single most cost-effective kind of aid work. It’s cheap, it opens minds, it gives girls new career opportunities and ways to generate cash, it leads them to have fewer children and invest more in those children, and it tends to bring women from the shadows into the …

Continue reading

Share

May 07

The Politics of Pistachios

Sometimes, the strangest things can cause a rift, or continue to push apart, two countries.  It comes as no surprise that the United State and Iran are not ideologically on the same page.  The two nations have been at odds with one another over the development of nuclear energy, and over the years Iran has …

Continue reading

Share

Apr 22

Myanmar in the Balance

Regular readers of this blog will know that Myanmar has long been one of my favorite topics.  I’ve written many times, often quite hopefully, about what the future may hold for this isolated country as it begins to open up economically and socially.  New president Thein Sein has made serious moves towards reforming the military-ruled country, …

Continue reading

Share

Mar 25

Tourism in Cuba?

I’ve written a lot about the opening up of Myanmar and Bhutan and their possibilities for sustainable tourism, so today I thought I would look at another isolated country: Cuba.  Travel between the United States and Cuba has been forbidden since February 8th, 1969, just a few months after the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis. …

Continue reading

Share

Mar 07

The Homelessness Series: “The Game”

There are moments which redefine you. Ones that give you a whole new perspective on yourself, your identity, and the world you live in. Such moments force you to reevaluate your values, your beliefs, and everything you have always taken for granted about your life. Last March, one of those moments happened to me. This …

Continue reading

Share

Feb 25

Economics and Happiness

In the 1970s Richard Easterlin wrote an article titled “Does Economic Growth Improve the Human Lot? Some Empirical Evidence,” in which he described what is now known as the Easterlin Paradox and became the father of happiness economics. The Easterlin Paradox, simply stated, suggests that people do not get happier as they get richer.   …

Continue reading

Share