Smita

Author's details

Name: Smita Gaith
Date registered: 20 January, 2012

Biography

Smita Gaith graduate of New York University, where she received a Masters in International Public Health. As a public health professional, Smita has experience in the US, Kenya, and Brazil working in policy research and analysis, program planning and implementation, capacity building, data collection and analysis, outreach, and HIV/AIDS and life skills education. In her work with the SISGI group, Smita focused on global women's health, international development, and immigrant health issues.

Latest posts

  1. A Successful Strategy for Malaria Control — 4 May, 2012
  2. Mobile Banking as a Means to Development — 3 May, 2012
  3. Midwives Matter for Maternal Health and More — 27 April, 2012
  4. Nkundabana in Rwanda: Love for Children — 20 April, 2012
  5. Rethinking ASHA: The Frontline of India’s Maternal Health — 17 April, 2012
  6. The Role of Language in Immigrant Health Outcomes — 15 March, 2012
  7. The Missing Piece: Where Are Women in the Rio+20 Development Puzzle? — 2 March, 2012
  8. Helping New Immigrants Stay Healthy in the American Melting Pot — 24 February, 2012
  9. The Need for Planned Parenthood’s Crucial Services — 10 February, 2012
  10. Problems and Solutions: How the 2010 Earthquake Has Disproportionately Impacted Women — 20 January, 2012

Most commented posts

  1. Problems and Solutions: How the 2010 Earthquake Has Disproportionately Impacted Women — 4 comments
  2. The Missing Piece: Where Are Women in the Rio+20 Development Puzzle? — 2 comments
  3. Rethinking ASHA: The Frontline of India’s Maternal Health — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

May 04

A Successful Strategy for Malaria Control

Last week, April 25th, was World Malaria Day.  This awareness day began in 2007 by the World Health Assembly. Malaria is an illness that does not seem to exist in the US or many other countries. However, the problem persists in many developing countries. This is where people are most vulnerable to malaria. In 2010, …

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May 03

Mobile Banking as a Means to Development

According to a recent report by the World Bank, 75 percent of the world’s poor do not have a bank account.  Use of formal banking, the system of official bank accounts set up within financial institutions, is pretty rare within the developing world, even for those who actually have the bank accounts. Ten percent of …

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Apr 27

Midwives Matter for Maternal Health and More

May 5 is International Day of the Midwife, a globally recognized day to acknowledge the work of midwives around the world. Midwives are an undervalued asset in many countries. But the truth is, midwives could be key to achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) 4, 5, and 6, to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health, and …

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Apr 20

Nkundabana in Rwanda: Love for Children

In recent years, Rwanda has become a model for many of its neighbors in terms of health indicators. For example, maternal health indicators for the Millennium Development Goals are largely on track in that country. In addition, health systems’ strengthening has been improved with new financing systems and insurance schemes.  This has made accessing health …

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Apr 17

Rethinking ASHA: The Frontline of India’s Maternal Health

India’s National Rural Health Mission was launched in 2005 with the goal to “improve the availability of and access to quality health care by people, especially for those residing in rural areas, the poor, women and children.” With the ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist) program, the country has been making remarkable strides in the improvement …

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Mar 15

The Role of Language in Immigrant Health Outcomes

I recently wrote about how changing diets of immigrants can contribute to the decline in their health. There are many studies that explain how immigrants’ diets change with the inclusion and/or exclusion of foods. There are many other health barriers that immigrants can face when moving to the US. For example, they may live in …

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Mar 02

The Missing Piece: Where Are Women in the Rio+20 Development Puzzle?

The Rio+20 Summit has been generating lots of buzz lately, although the international meeting is not until this summer.  Fellow bloggers Julia and Katherine have discussed, at different lengths, the history and preparation of this year’s summit.  There are seven key categories up for discussion during the three-day event:  Jobs, energy, cities, food, water, oceans, …

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Feb 24

Helping New Immigrants Stay Healthy in the American Melting Pot

As a child of immigrants, growing up I ate traditional foods almost every day, and rarely indulged in the typical American diet. Eating healthy was not very difficult as a child; first of all, my mother was doing all the cooking. Second of all, traditional Indian diets are extremely friendly to a healthy palate.  Not …

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Feb 10

The Need for Planned Parenthood’s Crucial Services

In wake of last week’s decision – and subsequent reversal of that decision – by Susan G. Komen For the Cure to end grant funding to Planned Parenthood Federation’s (PPFA) cancer screening initiatives, I thought it would be interesting to explain in detail the work that is carried out by Planned Parenthood Federation.  You may …

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Jan 20

Problems and Solutions: How the 2010 Earthquake Has Disproportionately Impacted Women

Two years ago when a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, nearly everyone there suffered for it.  In the two years of recovery efforts since then, women continue to suffer.  Although health issues such as cholera and poor housing conditions impact many of the half million people living in camps for internally displaced persons (IDP), women are …

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