Category: Education

Education Development in Cambodia

Did you know that Cambodia has a literacy rate of 74 percent? That is considered one of the lowest rates in Asia. Literacy rates are used to determine education quality in each country. However, the primary education completion rate in 2009 was 84 percent and has been slowly increasing. The literacy rate is fairly low …

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Why Education for Girls is a Worthwhile Investment

“First, I think girls’ education may be the single most cost-effective kind of aid work. It’s cheap, it opens minds, it gives girls new career opportunities and ways to generate cash, it leads them to have fewer children and invest more in those children, and it tends to bring women from the shadows into the …

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Looking Back on China (1): Hello China?

“Are you a spy?” My supervising attorney asked me this when I was volunteering in the Pima County Superior Court. I told him I came here to study law, the field of which has been regarded as the realm of the elites in this society. Obviously, he could not figure out why I, a foreigner …

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The Homelessness Series: Whose Story is Really Being Told?

In an appearance at the Washington, D.C., Politics and Prose bookstore, Ehrenreich informed an adoring audience that previous attempts she’d made to pitch books about poverty to magazine and book editors had most commonly met with failure. Poverty wasn’t interesting to their readers, the editors had told her. This book, she said, was different; it …

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The Politics of Pistachios

Sometimes, the strangest things can cause a rift, or continue to push apart, two countries.  It comes as no surprise that the United State and Iran are not ideologically on the same page.  The two nations have been at odds with one another over the development of nuclear energy, and over the years Iran has …

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The Homelessness Series: Andre’s Story

Social justice, good. Charity, bad. At least that’s always been my philosophy. It’s simple. Straightforward. Easy to follow. Maybe that’s the problem. This personal philosophy first developed sometime around my sophomore year in college. After participating in several break trips, and spending a lot of time reflecting on systemic social problems and injustices, I grew …

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The Homelessness Series: What About the Kids?

According to a report conducted by the Coalition of the Homeless last month, a record high 50,000 people slept in New York City’s shelters this January. Fifty-thousand people. More people are now homeless in New York City than at any time since the Great Depression. Want to know an even scarier fact? Almost half of …

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Parents, Children and the Social Media Talk

Social technologies have broken the barriers of space and time, enabling us to interact 24/7 with more people than before. Most people spend their time sending emails, chatting with friends, posting videos or pictures, to being informed of the latest events. Everything can be done through Facebook, and Twitter. New social networking sites pop up …

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Freedom Through Acting, Not Guns

In Palestine, there is a city by the name of Jenin located in the West Bank.  A majority of the city’s population is made up of Palestinian refugees displaced from their homes.  Thousands of young children, teenagers, and college age youth grow up within the walls of this refugee city, and the future they look …

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What’s in a Name?

The Social Security Administration has officially joined the club. Better late than never, you could say. In August 2010, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives passed Rosa’s Law, which legally required the terms “mental retardation” and “mentally retarded” to be removed from all federal education, health, and labor laws. Just last month, the Social …

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